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Zombie Park: The Z-Day Trilogy, Book 1 , Hörbuc...
9,95 € *
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Ben Cutler just wants an honest way to make a lot of money! Unemployed and on the short end of the employment stick, he knows his chances of getting a traditional job is slim to never. Ever resourceful and always a forward thinker, Ben comes up with a brilliant idea - Zombie Park! Create a park with zombies, sell tickets and people will come by the hundreds. To his surprise, one of the richest men in the world backs his project and makes Ben an instant millionaire! Scientists Nicholas and Kathy Hollman have been commissioned by General Wilbur Poe to create "smart zombies" to be used on the battlefield instead of live soldiers. With glory in his eyes, Nicholas is determined to not only create the formula, but cut his wife out of the equation and take all the credit himself. Unfortunately for Nicholas, Kathy is the brain behind everything they do. Robert Forenstein has found the perfect cover for the smart zombie project in Ben Cutler's Zombie Park. He and General Poe will make America the first country to use zombies as weapons of mass destruction and make billions in the process! As with all plans, everyone has their own agenda and the Zombie Park project is no different. The plan rapidly unravels as Nicholas botches the experiments and is inadvertently creating an army of out of control zombies. With a trail of bodies in their wake, neither the Hollmans nor Forenstein realize the true motives behind General Poe's zombie army...and it ain't to save the world! 1. Language: English. Narrator: Persephone Rose. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/acx0/083903/bk_acx0_083903_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 29.03.2020
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When Soldiers Fall
29,90 CHF *
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Call it the Vietnam Syndrome or Black Hawk Down blowback. It's the standard assumption that Americans won't tolerate combat casualties, that a rising body count lowers support for war. But that's not true, argues historian Steven Casey; even worse, this assumption damages democracy. Fearing a backlash, the military has routinely distorted its casualty reports in order to hide the true cost of war. When Soldiers Fall takes a new look at the way Americans have dealt with the toll of armed conflict. Drawing on a vast array of sources, from George Patton's command papers to previously untapped New York Times archives, Casey ranges from World War I (when the U.S. government first began to report casualties) to the War on Terror, examining official policy, the press, and the public reaction. Not surprisingly, leaders from Douglas MacArthur to Donald Rumsfeld have played down casualties. But the reverse has sometimes been true. At a crucial moment in World War II, the military actually exaggerated casualties to counter the public's complacency about ultimate victory. More often, though, official announcements have been unclear, out of date, or deliberately misleading--resulting in media challenges. In World War I, reporters had to rely on figures published by the enemy; in World War II, the armed forces went for an entire year without releasing casualty tallies. Casey discusses the impact of changing presidential administrations, the role of technology, the dispersal of correspondents to cover multiple conflicts, and the enormous improvements in our ability to identify bodies. Recreating the controversies that have surrounded key battles, from the Meuse-Argonne to the Tet Offensive to Fallujah, the author challenges the formula that higher losses lower support for war. Integrating military, political, and media history, When Soldiers Fall provides the first in-depth account of the impact of battlefield losses in America.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 29.03.2020
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When Soldiers Fall
29,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Call it the Vietnam Syndrome or Black Hawk Down blowback. It's the standard assumption that Americans won't tolerate combat casualties, that a rising body count lowers support for war. But that's not true, argues historian Steven Casey; even worse, this assumption damages democracy. Fearing a backlash, the military has routinely distorted its casualty reports in order to hide the true cost of war. When Soldiers Fall takes a new look at the way Americans have dealt with the toll of armed conflict. Drawing on a vast array of sources, from George Patton's command papers to previously untapped New York Times archives, Casey ranges from World War I (when the U.S. government first began to report casualties) to the War on Terror, examining official policy, the press, and the public reaction. Not surprisingly, leaders from Douglas MacArthur to Donald Rumsfeld have played down casualties. But the reverse has sometimes been true. At a crucial moment in World War II, the military actually exaggerated casualties to counter the public's complacency about ultimate victory. More often, though, official announcements have been unclear, out of date, or deliberately misleading--resulting in media challenges. In World War I, reporters had to rely on figures published by the enemy; in World War II, the armed forces went for an entire year without releasing casualty tallies. Casey discusses the impact of changing presidential administrations, the role of technology, the dispersal of correspondents to cover multiple conflicts, and the enormous improvements in our ability to identify bodies. Recreating the controversies that have surrounded key battles, from the Meuse-Argonne to the Tet Offensive to Fallujah, the author challenges the formula that higher losses lower support for war. Integrating military, political, and media history, When Soldiers Fall provides the first in-depth account of the impact of battlefield losses in America.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 29.03.2020
Zum Angebot
Weaponeering the Future: Direct Energy Weapons ...
19,99 € *
zzgl. 3,00 € Versand

Direct Energy weapons can exist on the battlefield of today. Yet, the warfighter needs to know what Probability of Damage theses weapons can attain. Currently, the Joint Munitions Effectiveness Manual calculates a Single Sortie Probability of Damage for conventional Blast and Fragmentation weapons. Using Futures Research methodology allows determination of what effects Direct Energy weapons will impart in the year 2035. The Status of Futures Index (SoFI) method compares complex entities to one another across multiple dimensions. Adapting the Single Sortie Probability of Damage formula for Lasers, Microwave and Millimeter wave weapons allows a determination of their effectiveness. The required formulas for each type of Direct Energy Weapons' Probability of Damage (or Effect) are derived and explained. The Direct Energy weapons are compared to both conventional weapons and one another. Adjusting these Probability equations adjusted for various inputs enables a forecast of the future capabilities of each weapon. The current trend trajectory establishes a baseline estimate of future Probabilities of Effect. Then, disruptive technologies are analyzed for their effect on the weapons capabilities. Each type of weapon poses a unique challenge. For Laser to match the capabilities of Blast/Fragmentation weapons, the power output must be increased. Microwaves, not only require increases in power, but also advances in antenna technology. Millimeter wave weapons can currently produce the required power, but manufacturing the weapons proves an obstacle. To overcome these difficulties, new technologies must be pursued. The SoFI method allows continuous evaluation of progress toward the goal of effective Direct Energy Weapons.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 29.03.2020
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When Soldiers Fall
25,49 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Call it the Vietnam Syndrome or Black Hawk Down blowback. It's the standard assumption that Americans won't tolerate combat casualties, that a rising body count lowers support for war. But that's not true, argues historian Steven Casey; even worse, this assumption damages democracy. Fearing a backlash, the military has routinely distorted its casualty reports in order to hide the true cost of war. When Soldiers Fall takes a new look at the way Americans have dealt with the toll of armed conflict. Drawing on a vast array of sources, from George Patton's command papers to previously untapped New York Times archives, Casey ranges from World War I (when the U.S. government first began to report casualties) to the War on Terror, examining official policy, the press, and the public reaction. Not surprisingly, leaders from Douglas MacArthur to Donald Rumsfeld have played down casualties. But the reverse has sometimes been true. At a crucial moment in World War II, the military actually exaggerated casualties to counter the public's complacency about ultimate victory. More often, though, official announcements have been unclear, out of date, or deliberately misleading--resulting in media challenges. In World War I, reporters had to rely on figures published by the enemy; in World War II, the armed forces went for an entire year without releasing casualty tallies. Casey discusses the impact of changing presidential administrations, the role of technology, the dispersal of correspondents to cover multiple conflicts, and the enormous improvements in our ability to identify bodies. Recreating the controversies that have surrounded key battles, from the Meuse-Argonne to the Tet Offensive to Fallujah, the author challenges the formula that higher losses lower support for war. Integrating military, political, and media history, When Soldiers Fall provides the first in-depth account of the impact of battlefield losses in America.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 29.03.2020
Zum Angebot
When Soldiers Fall
25,49 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Call it the Vietnam Syndrome or Black Hawk Down blowback. It's the standard assumption that Americans won't tolerate combat casualties, that a rising body count lowers support for war. But that's not true, argues historian Steven Casey; even worse, this assumption damages democracy. Fearing a backlash, the military has routinely distorted its casualty reports in order to hide the true cost of war. When Soldiers Fall takes a new look at the way Americans have dealt with the toll of armed conflict. Drawing on a vast array of sources, from George Patton's command papers to previously untapped New York Times archives, Casey ranges from World War I (when the U.S. government first began to report casualties) to the War on Terror, examining official policy, the press, and the public reaction. Not surprisingly, leaders from Douglas MacArthur to Donald Rumsfeld have played down casualties. But the reverse has sometimes been true. At a crucial moment in World War II, the military actually exaggerated casualties to counter the public's complacency about ultimate victory. More often, though, official announcements have been unclear, out of date, or deliberately misleading--resulting in media challenges. In World War I, reporters had to rely on figures published by the enemy; in World War II, the armed forces went for an entire year without releasing casualty tallies. Casey discusses the impact of changing presidential administrations, the role of technology, the dispersal of correspondents to cover multiple conflicts, and the enormous improvements in our ability to identify bodies. Recreating the controversies that have surrounded key battles, from the Meuse-Argonne to the Tet Offensive to Fallujah, the author challenges the formula that higher losses lower support for war. Integrating military, political, and media history, When Soldiers Fall provides the first in-depth account of the impact of battlefield losses in America.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 29.03.2020
Zum Angebot